Tag Archives: can a child get ssdi?

How much does SSI pay per month?

How much will your Supplemental Security Income (SSI)  checks pay each month? Well, it varies as some states award additional income to the base amounts listed below. That being said, here are the amounts for 2012. Keep in mind that these amounts change each year in conjunction with the cost of living adjustment (COLA).

Social Security Administration SSI payout amounts for 2012:

 

Calculation details
Recipient Unrounded annual amounts for— Monthly amounts for 2012
2011 2012 a
Eligible individual $8,095.32 $8,386.75 $698
Eligible couple 12,141.61 12,578.71 1,048
Essential person 4,056.93 4,202.98 350
The unrounded amounts for 2012 equal the unrounded amounts for 2011 increased by 3.6 percent.

 

Payment reduction
Remember, these payouts are lowered depending on your countable income each year. If you are thinking of applying for disability benefits click for a free consultation or call 1-800-596-1533.

Posted in Social Security SSD/SSI | Tagged , , | 78 Comments

Does my income affect my child’s ability to qualify for Social Security Benefits?

How much income can parents have before their children no longer qualify for Supplemental Security Income benefits?

Disabled children can qualify for benefits under the Supplemental Security Income (“SSI”) program, which is administered by the Social Security Administration, depending: (1) on the nature of their disabilities; (2) on how much income they have (if any); and (3) on their available resources. Children’s “available resources” include the income (and assets) of their parents and guardians. Therefore, many parents and guardians of disabled children wonder how much income they can have before their children no longer qualify for SSI benefits.

The Social Security Administration (“SSA”) defines a child as someone who is not married; is not head of a household; and is under age 18, or is under age 22 and regularly attending school. This discussion only applies to SSI benefits for disabled children, as the SSA defines the terms “disabled” and “children.”

1. Nature of disability. According to the definition established by the applicable laws and regulations, a child is “disabled” if the child “has a medically determinable physical or mental impairment, which results in marked and severe functional limitations, and which can be expected to result in death or which has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months.” In other words, a child is disabled for purposes of SSI benefits if the child has a very serious medical condition that will last (or has lasted) for at least one year. For example, a child who suffers from cystic fibrosis could qualify for SSI benefits. A child with a minor broken leg, but who did not otherwise have a serious medical condition, would probably not qualify.

2. Child’s income (if any). In terms of a child’s income, a child may not earn more than $1,000.00 per month from employment and still qualify to receive SSI benefits (in 2011; the limit on a child’s total monthly income changes every year). On the other hand, a child who is unemployed, or who is employed but earns less than $1,000.00 per month (in 2011), would meet the income limit.

3. Income and resources (i.e. assets) of parents or guardians. The determination of a child’s eligibility to receive SSI benefits also takes into account

Income, in this context, comes in two varieties: “earned income” and “unearned income.” Earned income consists of “wages from employment, net earnings from self-employment, certain royalties and honoraria, and sheltered workshop payments.” Unearned income consists of money received from other sources, “such as Social Security benefits, pensions, state disability payments, unemployment benefits, interest income, and cash from friends and relatives.” Some income is exempt and does not count toward the applicable limits. The following chart illustrates the income limits currently applicable in many (but not all) circumstances.

Number of Ineligible Children in Household

All Income is Earned

All Income is Unearned

One Parent in Household

Two Parents in Household

One Parent in Household

Two Parents in Household

0

$2,821

$3,495

$1,388

$1,725

1

$3,158

$3,832

$1,725

$2,062

2

$3,495

$4,169

$2,062

$2,399

3

$3,832

$4,506

$2,399

$2,736

4

$4,169

$4,843

$2,736

$3,073

5

$4,506

$5,180

$3,073

$3,410

6

$4,843

%5,517

$3,410

$3,747

By “resources,” the SSA essentially means property. For instance, resources include bank accounts, cash, life insurance, real estate, stocks, U.S. savings bonds, vehicles and other property belonging to a child’s parents or guardians that could be exchanged for cash and used for food or shelter. Some resources, such as a home, household goods and personal effects, and money in pension funds, are exempt and do not count toward the applicable limits. Currently, the applicable resource limit (for non-exempt resources) is $2,000 for a single parent or guardian, and $3,000.00 for a couple.

To summarize: A disabled child’s eligibility for SSI benefits depends upon the nature of the child’s disability, the amount of income that the child earns (if any), and the income and resources available to the child—including resources available through parents and guardians. Regarding the resources of parents and guardians, the limits vary from case to case depending on the circumstances. The income limits listed in the foregoing chart, and the resource limits discussed above, might or might not apply in a specific situation because of the many rules and regulations, as well as exemptions, that govern SSI eligibility for disabled children. If you are the parent or guardian of a disabled child and would like to learn more about SSI eligibility, then talk with a lawyer with experience dealing with Social Security issues.

Posted in Social Security SSD/SSI | Tagged , | 54 Comments

Can a child get SSI in Ohio?

Can a Child Qualify for Social Security Disability Benefits?

Many parents and guardians with children under the age of 18 wonder whether their children could qualify for Social Security disability benefits.  Disabled children under the age of 18 can qualify for benefits under the Supplemental Security Income (“SSI”) program, which is administered by the Social Security Administration, depending on the nature of their disabilities, on their income, and on the resources available to them. According to 42 U.S.C. § 1382c(a)(3)(C)(i), a child under the age of 18 is disabled if the child “has a medically determinable physical or mental impairment, which results in marked and severe functional limitations, and which can be expected to result in death or which has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months.”  In simpler language, a “disability” for purposes of SSI benefits must be a very serious medical condition that will last for at least one year.  For example, a child who suffers from partial or total paralysis, or from mental retardation, could qualify for SSI benefits.  A child with a broken leg, however, would likely not qualify.

In addition to satisfying the definition of “disabled,” a child may not earn more than a certain amount from employment.  42 U.S.C. § 1382c(a)(3)(C)(ii) states that a child under the age of 18 who “engages in substantial gainful activity” does not satisfy the definition of “disabled.”  This means that a child who is employed and who earns more than $1,000.00 per month from employment would not qualify for SSI benefits in 2011 (the limit on a child’s total monthly income changes every year).  At the same time, a child who is unemployed, or who is employed but earns less than $1,000.00 per month, could qualify.

Further, a determination of a child’s eligibility for SSI benefits also involves the income of the child’s parents or guardians.  This part of the eligibility determination can be relatively complicated, but in short, a child whose parents or guardians could be described as among the working poor would probably qualify, whereas a child whose parents could be described as among the middle or upper class would probably not qualify (or would qualify for only minimal benefits).

Normally, a determination of eligibility can take three to five months.  Children with certain conditions, however, can qualify for immediate benefit payments while the determination is pending.  Examples of conditions that would qualify a child to receive immediate payments include cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, HIV infection, muscular dystrophy, total blindness and total deafness.

Although the Social Security Administration publishes a number of self-help guides regarding the eligibility of children for SSI benefits, the process of applying for SSI benefits can be complex.  If you have questions about whether your child could be eligible to receive benefits, then you should consider a free consultation with an attorney focusing in Social Security law.

Posted in Social Security SSD/SSI | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

Can the Child choose which Parent they want to live with in Ohio?

It is one of the most common myths that people maintain when it comes to child custody: Once a child reaches a certain age, that child can choose which parent to live with, right? Well, that is actually incorrect. However, this myth is based in history and actually grounded is truth. Under former Ohio law, once a child attained the age of 12 years old,child_support_ohio_termination that child had the power to choose which parent was to be deemed the residential parent and legal custodian of that child. However, under current Ohio law, minor children no longer have the ability to choose which parent they want to live with on a permanent basis. In other words, when the Court issues its final divorce decree which, among other things, allocates parental rights and responsibilities, it is not the child that determines which parent is to be the residential parent, even if that child is a teenager. Ohio law treats a 14 year old in the same manner as a 4 year old when it comes to determining which parent with be designated as the residential parent. And, like almost all issues involving minor children, the determination is guided by what is in the “best interest of the child”.

So, divorcing parents, remember that your child will not be choosing for or against you when it comes to custody issues. Rather, the Court will decide and you need to focus your energy on convincing the Court that it would be in the best interest of the child to live with you … do not work on convincing the child that he or she should choose you. Which, in truth, is not fair to the child anyway.

Posted in Family Law | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 55 Comments

Springfield Disability SSDI Attorney

loading map - please wait...

BLANK 48.216038, 16.378984

The Law Office’s of John T. Nicholson’s Springfield office is located at 150 North Limestone Street #217, Springfield, OH and is by appointment only. We are located on the second floor of the post office building downtown Springfield. Please call (937) 325-8500 for a free consultation or to schedule an appointment today. 

loading map - please wait...

Springfield Disability Lawyer 39.926403, -83.808176

 

Ohio Office Locations:

 

 Dayton * Cincinnati * Columbus * FranklinPiqua *

Troy * Xenia * Springfield *

 

All other states call 1-800-596-1533

Comments Off on Springfield Disability SSDI Attorney